Program

Program of Coaching Conference “Applied”

#CC2018
Coaching Conference 2018
9:30 – 9:45
Conference opening
9:30 – 9:45
9:45 – 10:30
Marilyn AtkinsonCreating a High performance teams
9:45 – 10:30
10:30 – 11:15
Sally BonneywellCan coaching be used to solve organisational issues?
10:30 – 11:15
11:15 – 11:35
Coffee break
11:15 – 11:35
11:35 – 13:00
Block I – Presentation of development projectsPharmanova – Vip mobile – Karanović & Nikolić
11:35 – 13:00
13:00 – 14:00
Lunch break
13:00 – 14:00
14:00 – 15:40
Block II – Presentation of development projectsIKEA – Ewe Comp – Akademija umetnosti u Beogradu
14:00 – 15:40
15:40 – 15:50
Coffee break
15:40 – 15:50
15:50 – 16:30
Keynote Speaker #3 – Alla KazajevaListening to Coaching Consumers: ICF research
15:50 – 16:30
16:30 – 17:15
Panel discussion
16:30 – 17:15
17:15 – 17:25
Closing conference
17:15 – 17:25

Marilyn Atkinson: “Creating a High performance teams”
A team is more than a group of people who work together. A high performing team is a group of people who share a common vision, goals, metrics and who collaborate, challenge and hold each other accountable to achieve outstanding results. Do you want better quality, faster response time, higher productivity, greater sensitivity to customers, improved profitability? People, working together in High performing teams, make this happen.Learn how to encourage team members to shift out of their competitiveness to truly acknowledge, trust and stand for each other.


Sally Bonneywell: “Can coaching be used to solve organisational issues , or is it just one to one development?”
Coaching has grown exponentially as an effective way to develop individual leaders over the last few years. This is good news for companies and executive alike, but what about some of the big, systemic issues that organisations are facing such as gender imbalance in leadership, or time to market in drug development? Can coaching play a role here, or is it limited to one to one executive development. In this session, Dr Bonneywell explores the innovative use of coaching in organisations and draws upon her experience of leading the GSK Coaching Centre of Excellence to share examples of designing initiatives, gaining traction within the organisation and of measuring and evaluating the impact.


Alla Kazajeva ICF: “Listening to Coaching Consumers: ICF research”
International Coach Federation (ICF) conducts in-depth studies of coaching market and coaching consumers since 2007. In this session, Conference attendees will be introduced to the results of 2017 Global Consumer Awareness Study. Commissioned by ICF and conducted by PwC Research, this is ICF’s largest consumer study yet, incorporating 27 134 responses from across 30 countries. How aware of professional coaching is the general public? How do views of coaching vary across generations? The perceived importance of coaching credentials. How consumers answer on the importance of their coach to be Credentialed? The 2017 ICF Global Consumer Awareness Study explores these questions, and more: to help you better understand consumers, market your coaching services accordingly and help organizations to select professional coaches for their organizations.


Panel discussion: Non-hierarchical leadership – Utopia or next stage of leadership development?
An organization’s leadership structure determines how workflow, accountability and authority work together. Hierarchical leadership employs a top-down, pyramid-shaped structure with a narrow center of power that trickles down to widening bases of subordinate levels. Nonhierarchical leadership flattens the pyramid to form a structure with decentralized authority and fewer levels. Hierarchical leadership is well established in organizations around the world, its positive sides and limitations are already know. The rigidity of a hierarchy is well-suited to highly regulated businesses. On the other side nonhierarchical leadership is quite new and some professionals think that its effects are very limited. Other professionals claim that decentralization gives employees a higher level of responsibility and accountability for their work, as well as bigger stakes in outcomes. It encourages functional diversity within roles, and with it, creativity, because employees aren’t confined to specific areas of specialization. This allows the organization to operate with less redundancy, as teams can share resources more readily than hierarchical divisions can.